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The Kunthaville Afternoon Tea

The refined ritual of Afternoon Tea originated, like Ceylon Tea, in the 19th century. At first an aristocratic British invention, the experience journeyed to Asia during the Golden Age of Travel, where it remains a cherished tradition to this day.

An afternoon of Paris Rose

This afternoon tea is in honor of the Rose. Roses are one of the oldest flowers  in the world, and have been lovingly referenced in literature, music, and art  for centuries inviting feelings of glamor, beauty and elegance. Rose petals  have also been known for their antioxidant and stress-relieving benefits.  Mini cupcakes infused with the two most celebrated Kunthaville Teas – the  Paris Rose and the Midnight Vanilla – have been curated especially for this  afternoon tea. 

Kunthaville is serving the first-of-its-kind Ceylonese afternoon tea in  Singapore, consisting entirely of authentic Ceylonese delicacies such as the  beetroot cutlets, Jackfruit balls, vegan mutton rolls and the vegetable patties;  both the savory and sweet Dutch Gundappams, Sri Lankan Street food – the  chili cheese toast, and the famous Idiyappam Varai or string hoppers. For  the English touch, a special Rose jelly. 

The afternoon tea will be accompanied by the celebrated Kunthaville Paris  Rose tea; a blend made with the luxurious golden tips, a touch of black tea  and natural Rose petals. 

Savor the delightful afternoon tea experience, blending the elegance of  Ceylonese tradition with the timeless allure of roses today!

An afternoon of Ceylonese Delights

Kunthaville is serving the most unique afternoon tea in  Singapore consisting entirely of Ceylonese delicacies such as the  beetroot cutlets, jackfruit balls, the vegan mutton rolls and the  vegetable patties; both the savory and sweet Dutch  Gundappams, Sri Lankan street food – the chili cheese toast,  mini versions of the infamous appams and a for an English  modern touch – the chocolate brownie and a shot glass of  Jaggery Jelly.  

The afternoon tea will be accompanied by the Ceylon Uva tea  plucked from the heights of 5000+ meters above sea level; served  with chickpea milk and jaggery sugar. 

Kunthaville Vallavu Spicy Beetroot Cutlets with Mango, Avocado, and Green Salad in Lime Mustard Dressing

Beetroot, a culinary gem cherished in Ceylonese cuisine, graces the plate in two delightful ways—cooked to perfection and added raw to invigorate our salads. This crimson-rooted delicacy traversed ancient trade routes, perhaps with the Moors, from North Africa to our region.

Our sweet Beetroot cutlets are a testament to this culinary journey. Infused with the aromatic spices of north eastern Sri Lanka, fresh herbs, onions, and chilli, each bite bursting with unforgettable flavours.



The Colonial Soup Tureen Cream of Roasted Butternut Pumpkin with Ginger, Turmeric, and Nutmeg

The influence of the West in Ceylon began during the era of Portuguese colonisation when they introduced New World treasures like chilies, pumpkin, and potatoes to the shores. From Ceylon and the Malabar Coast, we contributed the precious spices of cinnamon, pepper, and cardamom to the Western world. Further enriching our flavours, indigenous spices from the Nusantara region and beyond Southeast and East Asia found their way to Western kitchens.

During Ceylon’s fleeting romance with the French in the Batticaloa region, Ceylonese acquired unforgettable recipes, including this exquisite cream soup inspired by French cuisine.

Chelvanathan Thotam (Plantation) Entrée 1 Colonial Dutch Oven Sweet Gundappam Accompanied by Matakkalappu Poricha Coconut Chambal and a Drizzle of Coconut Milk

The origins of this delightful dish remain a subject of debate—did it originate from Malabar or Ceylon? Both regions boast their special recipes, featuring coconut milk and ground rice as key ingredients. The culinary team presents their own interpretation: a sweet and savoury fusion of a classic  Ceylonese crepe recipe, prepared in a Dutch Oven, and served with a side of delectable roasted coconut Chambal.

Entrée 2 Signature Curry Leaf Coconut Rice Accompanied by Spicy Matakkalppu Palakai Peratal (Dry JackFruit Curry), Poonikai Peratal (Sauteed Small Green Beans), Raw Mangkai (Mango) Chambal, and Velarikai (Cucumber) Chambal

Experience the essence of a traditional Ceylonese lunch feast, a culinary celebration of diverse flavours and textures. In the menu, you will encounter terms like poriyal (fried), varuval (roasted), thuvaiyal (ground), chambal (sambol or sambal), kulambu (gravy), rasam (pepper water of some sort), masiyal (mashed), peratal (dry curry), varai (dry pan roasted with coconut), and theeyal (pan-fried till almost burnt, akin to the wok hey in Chinese cuisine). Each dish tells a story, and together, they create a symphony of tastes that reflect the rich tapestry of Ceylon culinary heritage.

Sweet Landings Treasures of Ceylon:Chilled Sago Pearls with Ruby and Emerald Jelly in Coconut Cream

Dive into a cool and creamy blend of sago pearls, adorned with vibrant ruby and emerald jellies, in a luscious coconut cream. While Sri Lanka is renowned for its gemstones, this dessert reflects the precious jewels once harvested from the renowned Gulf of Mannar, treasures that graced the coffers of royalty and private collectors for generations. Legend has it that even the Queen of Sheba presented King Solomon with a chest of these exquisite Mannar pearls.

Palm Sugar and Coconut Savour the natural sweetness of palm sugar and the rich, creamy texture of coconut, as they combine to create a harmonious and comforting dessert. It is a nod to the abundance of Ceylon’s pink and red rubies, yellow sapphires, and emeralds—precious gems that have been cherished and traded since ancient times.

Fresh Fruit Steeped in Cinnamon Laced Syrup

Immerse your senses in the warm embrace of fresh fruits steeped in a syrup delicately infused with cinnamon.

 

 

 

 

 

Sweet Landings Treasures of Ceylon:Chilled Sago Pearls with Ruby and Emerald Jelly in Coconut Cream

Dive into a cool and creamy blend of sago pearls, adorned with vibrant ruby and emerald jellies, in a luscious coconut cream. While Sri Lanka is renowned for its gemstones, this dessert reflects the precious jewels once harvested from the renowned Gulf of Mannar, treasures that graced the coffers of royalty and private collectors for generations. Legend has it that even the Queen of Sheba presented King Solomon with a chest of these exquisite Mannar pearls.

Palm Sugar and Coconut: Savour the natural sweetness of palm sugar and the rich, creamy texture of coconut, as they combine to create a harmonious and comforting dessert. It is a nod to the abundance of Ceylon’s pink and red rubies, yellow sapphires, and emeralds—precious gems that have been cherished and traded since ancient times.

The final touch with the very traditional Thothal candy

Thothal is a dark candy delicacy made from jaggery – a soft, deep brown sugar with an almost smoky caramel taste which comes from the sap taken from the base of the flower cluster of the sugar palm. 

Coconut milk and rice flour are the two other ingredients in Thothal. Thothal is said to have actually originated from the occupying Portuguese in the 16th century, while others claim it was the Indonesian settlers who brought with them their technique for making this delicious confectionary.

Kunthaville Vallavu Spicy Beetroot Cutlets and Jackfruit Rolls with Mango, Avocado, and Green Salad in Lime Mustard Dressing

Beetroot, a culinary gem cherished in Ceylonese cuisine, graces the plate in two delightful ways—cooked to perfection and added raw to invigorate our salads. This crimson-rooted delicacy traversed ancient trade routes, perhaps with the Moors, from North Africa to our region.

Our sweet beetroot cutlets are a testament to this culinary journey. Infused with the aromatic spices of north eastern Sri Lanka, fresh herbs, onions, and chilli, each bite bursting with unforgettable flavours.

The Colonial Soup Tureen Cream of Roasted Butternut Pumpkin with Ginger, Turmeric, and Nutmeg

The influence of the West in Ceylon began during the era of Portuguese colonisation when they introduced New World treasures like chilies, pumpkin, and potatoes to the shores. From Ceylon and the Malabar Coast, we contributed the precious spices of cinnamon, pepper, and cardamom to the Western world. Further enriching our flavours cape, indigenous spices from the Nusantara region and beyond Southeast and East Asia found their way to Western kitchens.

Chelvanathan Thotam (Plantation) Entree 1 Colonial Dutch Oven Sweet Gundappam accompanied by Matakkalappu Poricha Coconut Chambal and a Drizzle of Coconut Milk

The origins of this delightful dish remain a subject of debate—did it originate from Malabar or Ceylon? Both regions boast their special recipes, featuring coconut milk and ground rice as key ingredients. The culinary team presents their own interpretation: a sweet and savoury fusion of a classic  Ceylonese crepe recipe, prepared in a Dutch Oven, and served with a side of delectable roasted coconut Chambal.

Entrée 2 Signature Curry Leaf Coconut Rice accompanied by Spicy Matakkalppu Palakai Peratal (Dry JackFruit Curry), Poonikai Peratal (Sauteed Small Green Beans), Raw Mangkai (Mango) Chambal, and Velarikai (Cucumber) Chambal

Experience the essence of a traditional Ceylonese lunch feast, a culinary celebration of diverse flavours and textures. In the menu, you will encounter terms like poriyal (fried), varuval (roasted), thuvaiyal (ground), chambal (sambol or sambal), kulambu (gravy), rasam (pepper water of some sort), masiyal (mashed), peratal (dry curry), varai (dry pan roasted with coconut), and theeyal (pan-fried till almost burnt, akin to the wok hey in Chinese cuisine). Each dish tells a story, and together, they create a symphony of tastes that reflect the rich tapestry of Ceylon culinary heritage.

Starters

Main Dishes

Wine

Cocktails

Happy Hours. Tasty Lunches. Enjoy Good Times With Us.

Hours
Monday-Wednesday: 11a-9p
Thursday-Saturday: 11a-10p
Happy Hour: Everyday 2p-6p